Easier way to predict how chemical compounds will interact

Technology
New research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical compounds interact.

New research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical compounds interact.

Led by Dr Jennifer Hiscock of the University of Kent, a team of researchers has identified a new more cost-effective way of predicting how compounds known as amphiphiles will interact with each other to impart specific physical properties to a solution.

The study, entitled Towards the prediction of global solution state properties for hydrogen bonded, self-associating amphiphiles, has revealed for the first time the potential for simple, easily accessible new methods of predicting on a computer how the compounds will behave.

The research involved the team using computer modelling to exhibit desired, pre-programmed properties before the chemical compounds even exist in real life.

The research is likely speed up the development — and decrease costs — associated with developing new methods of delivering drugs and medical-grade soaps and gels.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Kent. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

Cite This Page:

Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily’s free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks:

Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily — we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?